A Picture of Health Series

£168.80

Society can be the cause of ill-health, not just individuals.

Quantity:
SKU: 2222
Categories: ,
Tags: , , ,
Year Produced: 1980
Running time: 560 minutes

Description

A Bit of Class
Looks at the mythical idea that the NHS created equality in health care. Tower Hamlets is chosen as the focus, a predominantly working class area where there is a high incidence of occupational ill-health. Residents speak for themselves, explaining the ways in which their health is affected by housing, work and a generally poor environment.
The Lady Killers
Gender differences are also a cause in health disparity. Nowadays women are more likely to become smokers than men and are more likely to suffer the consequent associated diseases.
Who Cares?(Picture of Health)
Who cares for the carers is the question posed by this film. Hospital workers are prone to suffer all kinds of occupational health hazards and for those at the bottom of this complex social hierarchy, stress is often one of the biggest problems.
N.B. It is particularly important to quote the title of this part as shown to avoid confusion with another film with the same title.
Eat your Heart Out
We all eat more and more processed foods. Fat, sugar and salt are becoming an increasingly important part of our diet. All this has led to a big increase in coronary heart disease.
Just like Rain
Looks at the relationship between ill-health and the use of pesticides. It questions the way pesticides are regulated in Britain.
A Growing Problem
In the third world the primary causes of ill-health are poor sanitation, inadequate housing and lack of food and water.
Bangladesh: the People’s Health
A health project near Dacca is training illiterate and landless women metalwork and carpentry; they are employed in a pharmaceutical factory and offered the chance of a basic education.
The Dyeing Industry
The Sheffield Occupational Health Project involves co-operation between workers and GPs and demonstrates a new and effective approach to the prevention of illness. . Dye workers believe that carcinogenic substances used in their industry are not sufficiently well known.